Category Archives: Opinions

Thank You!

THANK YOU FOR YOUR PARTNERSHIP
I wanted to send out a note of “thank you” to everyone who has worked with me throughout the years in advertising the blogs. The blogs are now read by faithful Bible students in about 100 countries of the world. This would not have been possible if it were not for those of you who have told your friends about the blogs. Therefore, I want to thank each of you for continuing with me as I publish the initial writings of what eventually comes out as a book.

Most of my readers are in Europe and America. The reason for this is that most of the rest of the world does not have the privilege of being online all the time. Most of those in the developing world are limited in their online time, either at home, or at a computer cafe. Therefore, those who are in this situation, but read the blogs, need to have a special thanks for their loyalty.

I am presently working on three books. The first is at the proofreaders and will be published shortly. The other two will start appearing in segments in the next week or so. I do not apologize for the in-depth nature of what I write. In the theological world today – and I do not exaggerate – most of the religious books that are published are somewhat shallow in reference to exegetical studies in the text of the Bible. Therefore, I promise you that to the best of my studious ability, I will not seek to be shallow. That is not my purpose as a Bible student. I want to venture into God’s word to the extent that He inspired His word to be written.

I always remember a letter that I once received from one of my students over twenty years ago. I had written an editorial in a paper that we published for the International Bible Institute when it was active. In the editorial I quoted a couple students who said that the courses were very difficult. After the paper was sent out, another student wrote back and said, “What is all this complaining I hear about the courses being difficult? I READ THE TEXTBOOK TWELVE TIMES, and then I start studying through the Study Manual.”

My understanding of why the Holy Spirit took over 1,500 years to “write” the Bible was to make me feel good about studying every detail of what He had written. It is my goal to also take you there. The more we understand His word of inspiration, the better we feel.

Defending A Divergent

There are few things more difficult to accomplish in the realm of religious discussions than to defend Christianity with someone who has defined Christianity as something that would be viewed through the Crusades, or some divergent cult. This is particularly true in reference to the non-Christian world that has a concept of Christianity that is so different from what we read in our New Testaments.

Nevertheless, this is the challenge every true Christian has in a world of the international news media whose definition of Christianity is often based on the behavior of the “Christian” religious establishment of our times. There is Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and then they just throw in “Christianity.” The news media knows no difference. One religion is just as good as another. The international news media is as blind as the world of non-Christian religions in their view of true Christianity. And sadly, many of those who would “classify” themselves as “Christian,” are just as guilty in their dysfunctional understanding of true Christianity because of their lack of knowledge of what should define their faith (See Rm 10:17).

But this challenge also faced the early Christians. The government figure, Felix, considered the Christians of his day to simply be a “sect” of Nazarenes who were divergent from mainline Judaism (At 24:5). When the apostle Paul finally extracted himself from the religious establishment of the Jews, he looked back and called the religious canonization of rules and traditions in which he once lived to be the “Jews’ religion,” or “Judaism” (Gl 1:13).

The international news media today has a difficult time in understanding true Christianity.   When divergent becomes the norm by which the “Christian” religious establishment is defined, then simple Christians are thrown into a difficult predicament. In their efforts to explain themselves, they are more often talking past those to whom they would explain themselves.

I have always wanted to write a letter to the government of China. That I will eventually do, for one of the difficult philosophical predicaments that “divergent Christianity” has produced in this world is a twisted understanding of Christianity. What has been presented to the world of politics, unfortunately, is simply not who Christians are. Subsequently, the government policies of some nations of the world are often antagonistic against a “divergent Christianity” that finds no definition in the Bible. I would defend before such governments that the establishment of “divergent Christianity” in the West does not explain who true Christians are.

Here’s a suggestion for every Christian: What we should do, as those who are seeking to emulate in our lives the true faith that we discover in the word of God, is preach and live the person of Jesus Christ.   In the presence of those who are a part of “divergent Christianity,” we will defend Jesus, and live according to His gospel.

To most people of the world, “Christianity” is simply viewed as just another religion among the assortment of choices the religious world offers. But such cannot be said of Jesus Christ the Son of God. If we focus on Jesus, and not “Christianity,” then the world must deal with the origin of our faith. Instead of being antagonists against an established religion, they would have to deal with Jesus Christ. If we could somewhat rephrase a statement of a particular religion, we would make some changes by saying, “There is one God, and Jesus is not only His prophet, but also the only begotten Son of God.” This belief is the beginning of the separation of true Christianity from the beliefs of all other faiths of the world.

Russia

If I were a Russian today, I would have somewhat about which to boast. I know this is difficult for the Western liberal to understand. Being overwhelmed with all the bad things that Russia seemingly has done, or does, we must not forget that there is nothing that Russia has done on the international scene today that has not been done by Western countries throughout their history, including interference in the leadership of other nations. (We have not forgotten the meddling the West played in Latin American countries during the 1960s and 1970s.) We seem to forget that spies and covert operations and all the rest of the 007 influences is a part of what world countries do among themselves.   Therefore, no one has a right to judge another in these areas.

Unfortunately for Russia, their meanderings here and there have come at a time in history when the West is becoming increasingly liberal, both in culture and faith.   Combine this liberal philosophy of morals with the demise of religiosity in the West, and we have the perfect storm for a confrontation between the liberal/nonreligious West to be in conflict with an increasing growth in religiosity and conservatism of Russia.

Every nation would be envious of Putin as a leader. He is conservative. He is direct. He is subtle. He is religious. He is a no-nonsense leader who presently has a phenomenal approval rating of the people. Tell me of another president who has as high an approval rating as Putin who has been president of a country as long as he has? Nevertheless, as a leader of a Russian people who are becoming more conservative and religious, Putin becomes the ideal scapegoat for the Western liberal, both in morals and religion.

Since social and religious liberals of the West did not recently get their way in their movement of the Western nation of America to the far right, they have concluded that here must be some demon who was the vermin that stopped them from their efforts of the moral degradation of Western civilization. But we are not deceived. This is not a political matter of international election meddling.   It was and is a confrontation between a Russia that is becoming increasing conservative and religious, and a Western culture of people who are becoming increasingly liberal and nonreligious. I will have to side with the Russians on this one.